Skip to main content

Full text of "Florida Baptist College Annual Catalogue 1898-1899"

See other formats


^— <gK— <*. 




(1 






Annual 



(ATALOGUE 



of the 



Florida 



Baptist 



College 




Jacksonville, Florida. 
1898— i 899. 



W: 



S 




-1 



I 

:■ 



; 



/ 



1 



Annual 



(atalogue 



of the 



Florida 



Baptist 



College 



Jacksonville, Florida. 
1 898—1 899. 



; 



I 



CALENDAR 1899- 1900 



OCTOBER. 

October 4 First Term Begins. 

JANUARY, 1900. 
January 24-26 Term Examination- 
January 27 First Half Year Ends. 

January 29 Second Half Year Begins. 

MAY. 

May 24 Second Half Year Ends. 

Commencement. 



HOLIDAYS 1899- 1900. 

November 30 Thanksgiving Day. 

December 22 ^ 

to >• Christmas Vacation. 

January 2 ) 

February 22 Washington's Birthday. 

Sunday, May 20 Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday, May 21 Exercises of the Stowe Literary Society. 

Tuesday, May 22 Parents' Day, Oral Examinations. 

Wednesday, May 23 Exercises of Model Department. 

Thursday, May 24 Commencement. 



i 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



FOR ONE YEAR. 



Rev. R. Kemp Fernandina 

Mr. R. S. Mitchell Ocala 

Mr. C. Williams Jacksonville 

FOR TWO YEARS. 

Rev. James Johnson Jacksonville 

Mr. A. Le Bourveau Jacksonville 

Rev. L. N. Robinson St. Augustine 

FOR THREE YEARS. 

Mr. M. Ferguson Jacksonville 

Rev. C. Brewer ... Sanford 

Mr. F. J. Crump Jacksonville 

REV. JAMES JOHNSON, Chairman. 
N. W. COLLIER, Secretary. 



FACULTY 



N. W. COLLIER, A. B., President. 

Latin and Greek, Mental and Moral Science. 

Hiss S. A. BLOCKER, 

Principal Normal Department and Secretary of Faculty. 

T. G. EWINQ, Jr., B. S., 

Science and Higher Mathematics. 

J. ROSAflOND JOHNSON, 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

Miss IDELLA CASON, 

Bible and Domestic Science. 

Hiss fl. B. BLOCKER, 

History and Geography. 

Miss S. A. BLOCKER, 

Acting Matron. 

Hiss J. Q. SIHMONS, 

Model School. 

E. O. KNIGHT, 

Instructor in English Branches. 

Miss R. L. DIXON, 

Instructor in English Branches. 



COLLEGE COURSE 



For admission to this course, pitpils must pass a thorough examination in the 
common English branches, and also in the studies of the Preparatory Course, or 
their equivalent. The degree of A. B. will be given to those who graduate from 
this course. 



c* 



FALL. 


WINTER. 


SPRING 


Herodotus. 


Memorabilia-5. 


Odyssey-5, 


Cicero's de Senectute and 


De Amicitia, and Livy-4. 


Livy-4. 


De Amicitia-4. 


Algebra-5. 




Algebra-5. 


Hebrew History-2. 


Algebra-5. 


Hebrew History-2. 




Greek History-2 



English Composition, with themes, throughout the year — 1. 



Ca Demosthenes' Olynthiacs Plato's Apology-5. Prometheus Bound-5. 

^ and Philippics-5. Tacitus' Agricola and Pliny's Letters-4 

C Horace-4. Germania-4. Trigonometry and 

^ Geometry and Trigo- Surveying-5. 

^ Geometrv-5. nometry 5. 

t/5 Modern English History throughout the year — 2. 

English Composition, with themes, throughout the year — 1. 



Chemistry-3 Chemistrv-3. Astronomy-5. 

Laboratory Practice, triple periods-2. German or Qualitative 



© German-5. German-5. Analysis 5. 

Z Economics-4. Economics-4. Political Science-4. 

-s English Literature-3. English literature -3. Rhetoric-3. 

Elocution throughout the year — 2. 



Physics-3. Phvsics.3. Geology-4. 

^ Laboratory Practice, triple periods-2. Mineralogy-1. 

O Psychology-5. Ethics-5. Logic-3. 

g Sociology-4. Sociology-4. Sociology-4. 

tf) Biblical Literature-3. Biblical Literature-3 Greek Testament-5. 

Elocution throughout the year — 2. 



COURSE OF STUDIES 



NORMAL OR ACADEMIC COURSE. 

In this course the year is divided into two terms 
of 1(> weeks each. The recitation periods are to be 
fortv-tive minutes long. In any less time than this jus- 
tice cannot be done to the subjects. The figures in 
brackets, as in the Elementary Course, indicate the 
number of recitations per week. 

FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM— 

1. Rhetoric and Composition (5). 

2. Elementary Algebra, completed (5). 

3. Physiology (3). 

4. Elementary Latin (5). 

5. Bible— Old Testament History (3). 

SECOND TERM— 

1. Rhetoric and Composition (5). 

2. Plane Geometry (5). 

3. Physical Geography (3). 

4. Elementary Latin (5). 

5. Old Testament History (3). 

SECOND YEAR. 
FIRST TERM— 

1. English Literature (4). 

2. Plane Geometry (5). 

3. Latin — Caesar (5). 

4. Science — Physics (3). 

5. Bible— Life of Christ (3). 



SECOND TERM— 

1. English Literature (4). 

2. Plane Geometry, completed (5).) 

3. Latin, Cicero, Prose Composition (5). 

4. Physics (3). 

5. Life of Christ (3). 

THIRD YEAR, 
FIRST TERM— 

1. American Literature (4). 

2. Latin — Cicero, Sallust (5). 

3. Elementary Greek (5). • 

4. American History (3). 

5. Bible— Doctrines (3). 

SECOND TERM— 

1. American Literature (4). 

2. Virgil, Aeneid (5). 

3. Greek — Anabasis begun (5). 

4. American History (3). 

5. Bible— Doctrines (3). 

i , 
FOURTH YEAR 

FIRST TERM— 

1. Latin, Virgil's Aeneid (4). 

2. Greek, Anabasis (3 books) (4). 

3. Plain Trigonometry (5). 

4. Chemistry (3). 

5. The founding of the Christian Church. 
(>. Psychology (5). 

SECOND TERM— 

1. Latin, Cicero's Orations, Composition (4). 

2. Greek, Selections, Herodotus (4). 



3. Pedagogics (5). 

4. Chemistry (3). 

5. Study of Acts and Epistles. 

6. Practical Ethics (5). 



MODEL SCHOOL COURSE 



PRIHARY AND KINDERGARTEN. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Monroe's Reading Chart, Swinton's First Reader, 
Number Lessons (the numbers in order to 10, inclusive), 
Object Lessons, Plants, Place and Direction, Drawing, 
Writing with pencils and on slate, Singing. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Reader, Oral Spelling, Number Lessons (the 
numbers in order to 20 inclusive), Object Lessons (Ani- 
mals, Land and Water), Writing, Form Lessons. 

THIRD Y^EAR. 

Third Reader, Primary Arithmetic, Primary Geog- 
raphy (of City, County and State, with Map drawing 
and Sand Table) and Globe Lessons, Dictation Exer- 
cises, Writing, Copy Book No. 1, Singing. 



ELEMENTARY ENGLISH COURSE. 

An applicant for admission to this course must be 
able to read with expression in an ordinary Third 



10 

Reader, and must have a good working knowledge of 
the Four Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic. 

The figures in brackets after each subject indicate 
the number of recitations per week. In the first and 
second year of this course the recitation periods are 
to be at least thirty minutes long; and in the third and 
fourth year they are to be forty-five minutes long: 

FIRST YEAR. 

Third Reader and Supplementary Reading, Spelling, 
Arithmetic through fractions, Geography, Language 
Lessons, Primary Science, Writing, Copy Books Nos. 
2 and 3. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. Reading in Fourth Reader and books in Natural 
History (5). 

2. Geography, Oral and Written Exercises in Spell- 
ing (4). 

3. Penmanship with Object Drawing (4). 

4. Elementary Arithmetic, Mental and Written (5). 

5. Graded Oral Lessons in Language (5). 

6. Bible Stories from Old Testament (3). 

TIHIRD YEAR. 

1. Reading in Fifth Reader and in books on History 
and Geography (5). 

2. Oral and Written Exercises in Spelling (4). 

3. Penmanship with Freehand Drawing (3). 

4. Elementary Arithmetic, completed (5). 

5. Elementary Grammar and Composition (5). 
(5. Elementary Geography (5). 

7. Bible — Old Testament Characters (3). 



11 

FOURTH YEAR. 

1. Reading in English Authors, Prose and Poetry (5). 

2. Dictation Exercises in Spelling (3). 

3. Penmanship with Freehand Drawing (4). 

4. Practical Arithmetic, completed (5). 

5. Grammar and Composition completed (5). 

6. Geography, with Map Drawing, completed (5). 

7. Bible — Old Testament Characters, completed (5). 

FIFTH YEAR. 

1. Literature and Composition throughout the 
year (5). 

2. Elementary Algebra throughout the year (5). 

3. Elementary Zoology the first 16 weeks (5). 

4. Elementary Botany second 16 weeks (5). 

5. Civil Government first 16 weeks (5). 

6. Bookkeeping second 16 weeks (5). 

7. United States History throughout the year (5). 

8. Bible — New Testament Characters and order of 
books (3). 



LANGUAGES. 

The subjects taught in this course are outlined else- 
where. The aim shall be thoroughness rather than 
rapidity. Another year, it is hoped to add Spanish and 
make it elective. 

DEPARTMENT OF PEDAGOGY. 

This course is designed to give practical instruction 
in art and science of teaching. Besides studying the 
regular text-books selected, Senior and Senior Middle 
Normals are expected to do practice work in Model 
School. 



12 
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

Branches of Mathematics embraced in this course 
are: Arithmetic, Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, 
Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Drill in examples and problems is given in the lower 
branches, with a view of securing accuracy and rap- 
idity. Originality and independence are encouraged. 

Mathematical instruments 1 will be used in explaining 
and illustrating the truths of mathematics. The course 
is arranged so as to develop the pupil's mind in accord- 
ance with the psychological laws. It is the plan to de- 
velop thoroughness rather than rapidity of advancement. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE. 

The purpose of this course is to give general knowl- 
edge of the studies usually embraced in a scientific 
course, and to awaken research and investigation. 

The branches of science taught are Chemistry, Phy- 
siology, Physics, Astronomy, Botany, Geology, Miner- 
alogy. Laboratory Practice is given in connection 
with each branch. 

OUR MUSICAL DEPARTMENT 

Is under the careful instruction of J. Rosamond 
Johnson. 

The three years' course in piano playing, consists of 
studies from Czerny, Loeschhorn, Cramer, Jensen, and 
Bach. 

Voice culture (Italian method), Solfeggio and chorus 
singing a specialty; embracing the works of Mozart, 
Rossini, and others of the old school; also works from 
the best modern composers. 

Harmony and composition given to advanced piano 
students free of charge. 



13 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

It is the aim of this department to give the students 
scientific knowledge of farming. Special attention is 
given to the use of different fertilizers. All of the 
vegetables used during the school year are produced 
on the premises. During the present year a great 
many young men took advantage of the opportunities 
offered in this department. 

Students receive extra pay for work done in this de- 
partment. Many were able to make enough to pay a 
large share of their current expenses for the school 
year. 

It is the plan for next season to conduct this depart- 
on a much larger scale than hitherto. 

Work in this department does not interfere in any 
way with the prosecution of the regular literary stud- 
ies. 

ELOCUTION. 

There is no art like the art of good and effective 
speaking. The oratorical contest will be conducted at 
least three or four times a year to foster the art of pub- 
lic speaking. The students' weekly literary societies 
furnish opportunity for the student to write essays 
upon the practical topics, develop skill in public debat- 
ing and general cultivation of the art of graceful and 
forceful public speaking. The teachers from time to 
time assist the pupils in the direction of these meet- 
ings, but they are mostly left alone to develop freedom 
of thought and expression and business tact. 

RELIGION. 

We believe that man's first duty is to love God. To 
this end religious services, consisting of Scripture read- 
ing, singing and praying, begins every day's work. The 
Sunday-school International Lessons are studied each 
Sunday. Students attend preaching services every 



14 

Sunday, either in Academy chapel or at some of the 
city churches, accompanied by a teacher. 

Everything is done to lead the seeker after truth to 
the feet of Him who is the truth. 

During the present year almost all unconverted pu- 
pils in our boarding department were don verted. 



INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 

This course is planned and designed to have the 
young women taught theoretically and practically to 
understand the following household duties, viz: 

(a). Sweeping, dusting and house-cleaning. (b). 
Dining-room work, washing of dishes and care of sil- 
ver, (c). Chamber work and care of linens, (d). Se- 
lecting fuels, making and caring for fires, (e). The 
selection of foods adapted to different ages, constitu- 
tions and climates, (f). Methods of preserving and 
caring for raw material and for cooked or prepared 
food. (g). How to regulate the heat for different kinds 
of cooking, (h). The stirring and beating of batters 
and making of yeast, (i). The making of bread and 
biscuit of all kinds, and of different kinds of plain 
cake and pastry, (j). The cooking of meats, fish, mince- 
meats, sauces and gravies, (k). The preparation of 
foods for invalids. 

SEWING. 

The course in sewing is to include thorough instruc- 
tion and practice in the various kinds of stitching, 
hemming, tucking, pleating, mending, darning, etc. 
Making sheets, pillow-slips, towels, aprons, underwear, 
simple gowns, children's wear, together with full in- 
struction in the use of the sewing machine. 



15 

DRESS MAKING. 

The course in dress making is to include cutting 
(with and without the use of a chart), making, fitting 
and trimming of dresses, excepting the more elabo 
rate and costly; the study of materials, prices, and 
buying; the selection of appropriate colors, etc. 

FURNISHING AND SANITATION. 

Under this head instruction is to be given on the 
planning and furnishing of the various rooms of an 
ordinary dwelling, with a view to comfort, health 
and economy; and on the selection and purchase of all 
articles needed for such a dwelling, and on its environ- 
ment, including out-buildings, wells and drainage. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

Under this head such instruction is to be given in 
anatomy and physiology as will properly prepare the 
students to understand and appreciate the instruction 
in hygiene which is to embrace such subjects as the 
following: Cleanliness, proper clothing, foods, female 
development, maternity, the care of children, nursing, 
with a knowledge of the simpler household remedies. 
Following these subjects and in connection with them 
pointed and familiar instructions are to be given on 
the one-room cabin, the proper training of children, 
their amusements, etc., entertaining, social purity, tem- 
perance, choice of companions, social gatherings, court- 
ship, and marriage, proper use of time, home associa- 
tions, and amusements, what books to read, and sim- 
ilar subjects. 

LIBRARY. 

We have a foundation of a library laid. It consists 
of about 400 volumes. A number of A T aluable volumes 



16 

have been collected through the kindness of our many 
friends. We are anxious to increase this number as 
rapidly as possible, and therefore solicit donations of 
good books from our friends. 



PRIZES. 



THE J. W. WHITE PRIZE ESSAY. 

The gentleman whose name the prize bears lives in 
the neighborhood of the school, and is the Editor of 
"The Journal of Commerce." He offers this gold medal 
to the boy, belonging to either of the two most ad- 
vanced classes, who writes the best essay upon given 
subject. 

THE MT OLIVE A. M. E. SUNDAY-SCHOOL MEDAL. 

The above named Sunday-school offers a beautiful 
silver medal to the student who makes the highest 
average in the quarterly examinations, regardless of 
the class or grade, to be worn 'till the next quarter, 
to be yielded to the victor in subsequent quarterly 
examinations. 



OUR AIM. 



Our aim is to perfect human character. Our method 
is a sound Christian education, putting every faculty 
and organ under complete control of Him who came 
to restore us to our original glory. Knowledge in the 
mind, divine love in the heart and skill in the hand, 
is our idea of a perfect education. The successful man 



•can do something that somebody wants done; he can 
put skilled labor on the market. To accomplish this 
an industrial feature is attached to our school, though 
infantile in scope. Jesus Christ, with a carpenter's 
tool in his hands, is a stupendous object lesson to the 
world. 

LOCATION. 

The Florida Baptist Academy is located in the 
northeastern part of Jacksonville, in what is known as 
Campbell's Addition. It is reached by any street car 
line in the city, and almost from any point. Electric 
cars from the Union depot transfer to Newnan street, 
bringing passengers within six blocks of the building. 
We are in immediate touch with the heart of the city, 
but removed from its unholy influences. Said the late 
Bishop Ward, who was our neighbor: "You have 
used more wisdom in the selection of your school site 
than all the other schools. They need to follow your 
example." 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Our Institution is open to worthy young people of 
both sexes and all denominations. We are neither 
foolishly denominational noiv rabid\; T sectarian. ^ T 
candidates for admission should be at least xourteen 
years of age. By making special arrangements, a few 
may be taken less than 14 years of age. Former stu- 
dents should notify us by Sept. 15th, of their intention 
to return. 



18 

Letters of good moral character from pastors of 
churches or reputable persons are necessary before en- 
trance. 

If from another school, letters of honorable dismis- 
sion are required. Boys and girls whom parents and 
town authorities caunot control are not wanted. Ap- 
plicants will be assigned to classes determined by their 
examinations. 

Preferences will be given to pupils coming on the- 
first day of school. Pupils with no purpose are human 
weeds and have no place in this garden of service. 

Text books cost extra and must be paid for cash. 
From $4.00 to $8.00 covers cost of books, according to- 
t-lass of student. Ours is a Christian institution, but 
business just the same. All bills are due in advance. 
Ten days delinquency subjects pupils to suspension. 

Provisions cost from twenty-five to forty per cent, 
more in Florida than in any State in the South or 
Southwest. 

SPECIAL RAILROAD RATES TO STUDENTS. 

One-fourth fare will be granted to students returning 
home, if they secure agent's certificate showing that 
they paid full fare when coming to school. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition 1.00 

Board 6.00 

Washing 50 

.Total per mon4f^ , $7.50- 

Girls do their own washing, reducing their bills fifty 
cents per month. 



19 

Instrumental music costs $2.00 per month extra. 

Without music, boys $7.50 per month 

With music, boys 9-50 per month 

Without music, girls 7.00 per month 

With music, girls 9-00 per month 

All boarding students must pay an incidental fee of 
$1.00. Day pupils 25c. This fee will not be refunded 
nnder any condition. 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Quality, not quantity, is our standard. 

2. Christianity is the principle; a moral life the evi- 
dence. 

3. Girls and boys are firmly held in their respective 
places. 

4. Superior healthfulness and an absence of evil in- 
fluences from our neighborhood. 

5. Unsurpassed water. 

6. Accommodations are ample and homelike, com- 
fort and attractiveness thrown over everything. 

7. Our rules know no exception — don't bend. 

8. Moral lapses or inability to receive moral impres- 
sions will be sufficient causes for immediate expulsion. 

9. Student's correspondence is subject to inspection 
and regulations. 

10. Our school is a workshop, and not a house, of 
pleasure. 

11. Gambling, card-playing, tobacco using, whiskey- 
drinking and kindred vices, are offences for which no 
excuses will be accepted. 

12. All students must attend religious exercises. 

13. Thoroughness in everything is a first principle. 

14. All students must work at least one hour a day 
without pay. 

15. Laziness in a student is a serious offense for 
which he will be punished accordingly. 



20 

16. The girls are under the constant supervision of 
the matron and other lady teachers, and are not al- 
lowed to leave the grounds unless the matron accom- 
panies them. 

17. The love which our students have for the Insti- 
tution and its teachers is simply wonderful and un- 
usual. 

18. All students from abroad are required to board 
in the family, unless special permission is given to 
board outside. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION IN JACKSON- 
VILLE. 

1. It is the first town of importance and culture in. 
the State. 

2. There is no more law-abiding city in the South. 

3. It is just, liberal and progressive. 

4. Here the pupil can be educated into true man- 
hood and womanhood, which is the crown of humanity.. 

5. It is the most easily reached town in the State 
from any point within or without it. Jacksonville is 
the heart of Florida. The various railroads and rivers 
leading to and from it are the veins and arteries. 

6. It is a city of first-class, and numerous churches 
of a high and advanced order of worship. 

7. The best medical attention possible is easily and 
reasonably obtained in case of sickness. 

8. The culture of Jacksonville is more pervasive and 
evident than in any other city. The student breathes 
an air of refinement and culture and returns home re- 
fined both by absorption and application. 

9. The white and colored people in Jacksonville live- 
together in the most perfect harmony with no opposi- 
tion to the education of the Negro. 

10. There is a host of Baptists in the city with prop- 
erty and piety from which a school finds solid moral; 
support. 



21 
OUR NEEDS. 

A boys dormitory— 13,000. 

A teachers 1 home— $2,000. 

An industrial building — $5,000. 

A printing outfit— $1,000. 

A library, with books, charts, maps, etc. 

Scholarships of $70 each for worthy students. 

Half scholarships of $35 each for worthy students. 

Special help for young men studying for the minis- 
try. 

An endowment fund for payment of teachers' sala- 
ries. 

For further information address President N. W. Col- 
lier, Jacksonville, Fla. 




ALUMNI. 



CLASS OF 1896. 

Andrews, Eugenia E. (Teacher) Jacksonville 

Blocker, Matilda B. (Teacher) '. . . .Jacksonville 

Lancaster, Joseph H Jacksonville 

Valentine, Panchita N. (Teacher) Jacksonville 

CLASS OF 1897. 

Dorsey, Augustus C. (Deceased) Jacksonville 

Greeley, Jonathan C. (In business) Jacksonville 

Knight, Elgin O Orlando 

CLASS OF 1898. 

Ambrose (Robinson), Maggie M Jacksonille 

Burnham, Jerusha C. (In business) Jacksonville 

Dixon, Rutha L Jacksonville 

Green, Julia A St. Augustine 

Robinson, Nannie V Jacksonville 

Simmons, Josephine Q. (Teacher) Jacksonville 

Stewart, Laura M Jacksonville 

SPECIAL. 

*Dorsey, Augustus C , ..Jacksonville 

Knight, Elgin O ,. . . .Orlando 



Burnham, Jerusha C Jacksonville 

Dixon, Rutha L Jacksonville 



--* 



Deceased. 



23 
NORMAL OR ACADEMIC COURSE 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Ambrose, Frances J Enterprise 

Cooke, Celestine Jacksonville 

Sevalle, Bessie Jacksonville 

SENIOR MIDDLE CLASS. 

Collins, Ruby D Pensacola 

Harris, Mattie Jacksonville 

JUNIOR MIDDLE CLASS. 

Griffin, Charles J Jacksonville 

Gantz, Hennie St. Augustine 

Houston, William E Sanf ord 

Matthews, Frances Jacksonville 

Saunders, Ella Jacksonville 

Williams, Isabelle Jacksonville 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Collier, James C Augusta, Ga. 

Gant, Leona Bartow 

Jenkins, Alvin O Providence 

James. John J Blitchton 

King, Francina Jacksonville 

Lew T is, Joseph L Augusta, Ga. 

Means, Willie M Jacksonville 

Payne, Lawrence M Greenland 

Robinson, Magdalene Jacksonville 

Williamson, Daniel A Jacksonville 



24 
GRADES. 



FIRST GRADE. 

Adams. Pinkie Jacksonville 

Boyer, Maggie ... .Jacksonville 

Boiling, Thomas Jacksonville 

Brown, Lizzie Palatka 

Carlton, Susie West Palm Beach 

English, Laura Jacksonville 

Frazier, Mattie Jacksonville 

Fogatie, Mosalind Jacksonville 

Gordon, Mattie B Cone 

Glymp, Viola St. Augustine 

Gibson, Robert E Lake Weir 

Grant, Hattie Palatka 

Grant, Minnie Palatka 

Griffin, Lymus Belleview 

Knight, Willie Orlando 

Cleans, Maggie Jacksonville 

Morand, Lorenza Jacksonville 

Morrison, Lizzie. . Fernandina 

Preston, Herman .Jacksonville 

Powell, Katie Jacksonville 

Robinson, Milton Orlando 

Smith, Emma D McMeekin 

Sevalle, George Jacksonville 

Smalls, Ida Jacksonville 

Thompson, Mattie Jacksonville 

Thomas, Blanche Pensacola 

Vann, Theodosia Jacksonville 

Williams, Alzada Savannah, Ga. 

SECOND GRADE. 



Abner, Estelle St. Augustine 

Alexander, Butler Sanford 



25 

Armstong, John Palatka 

Crump, Charity Jacksonville 

Ely, Bertha West Palm Beach 

Freeman, Joseph Jacksonville 

Lancaster, Roy St. Elmo Fernandina 

Lovett, Lola Jacksonville 

Moore, Robbie Jacksonville 

McQueen, Norman Jacksonville 

Potter, John Jacksonville 

Robinson, Annie Jacksonville 

Simms, Lula Jacksonville 

Smith, Mary B Enterprise 

HHIRD GRADE. 

Burnham, Arthur Jacksonville 

Campbell, Essie Jacksonville 

Domingo, Lillian Port Tampa 

Gilbert, Ruth Jacksonville 

Hammett, Clayton Sanford 

Jackson, Ernestine Pensacola 

Lancaster, Ulysess G Jacksonville 

Milton, Charles Jacksonville 

Sharpe, Virginia A Eustis 

Stewart, May L St. Augustine 

Turner, Sophia Sanford 

Williams, Emma Gainesville 

FOURTH GRADE. 

Abercrombie, Mitchell Jacksonville 

Blue, Mamie Jacksonville 

Brown, Eugene Jacksonville 

Burnham, Edna Jacksonville 

Bentley, Florence Jacksonville 

Culbreth, Frank Jacksonville 

DeCourcey, Rosa Jacksonville 

Dempsey, Lottie Jacksonville 



20 

Gilbert, Willie Jacksonville 

Harrison, Carrie M Jacksonville 

Hall, Jessie Jacksonville 

Jones, Minnie Jacksonville 

Lewis, George Jacksonville 

Long, Bertha Jacksonville 

Morris, Clementina Port Tampa 

Milton, Leroy Jacksonville 

Robinson, Joseph Jacksonville 

Robinson, Philip Jacksonville 

Rackett, Gertrude Jacksonville 

Stewart, Valena Jacksonville 

Thomas, Christina . . ...Jacksonville 

Turner, Carrie Jacksonville 

Williams, John Jacksonville 

Williams, Essie Jacksonville 

Wetmore, George Jacksonville 

FIFTH GRADE. 

Alexander, Lula Jacksonville 

JFenix, Louise Jacksonville 

Hooper, Eva Jacksonville 

Higginbotham, Theresa Jacksonville 

McQueen, lansa Jacksonville 

Meridith, Sarah Jacksonville 

Pratt, Hannah Fernandina 

Pratt, Emma Fernandina 

Robinson, Aggie Jacksonville 

Smith, Idella Tampa 

Thomas, Sarah Kev West 




27 
PRIMARY DEPARTTIENT. 



THIRD YEAR. 

Collins, Camilla Jacksonville 

Darby, John Jacksonville 

DeCosta, Alberta Jacksonville 

Gilbert, Lloyd Jacksonville 

Hall, Carrie . Jacksonville 

Howard, James Jacksonville 

Hampton, Ethel , Jacksonville 

Johnson, Alice Jacksonville 

Johnson, Zehoras Tampa 

Johnson, Beatrice Jacksonville 

LeParte, George Jacksonville 

Moore, Walter Jacksonville 

Moore, Bessie Jacksonville 

Morris, Ulee Tampa 

Pierceson, Lettie Mandarin 

Robinson, Charlotte Jacksonville 

Robinson, Rebecca Jacksonville 

Scott, Alice Jacksonville 

Simmons, Arthur Jacksonville 

Sims, David Jacksonville 

Thompson, Winfred Jacksonville 

Williams, Hannah Jacksonville 

White, Hattie Jacksonville 

Williams, Cecilia Jacksonville 

Total, 24. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Armstrong, Ira Jacksonville 

Armstrong, Lawsie. Jacksonville 

Franklin, Maggie Jacksonville 

Gordon, Willie Jacksonville 



28 

Hawkins, Nathaniel Jacksonville 

Haves, Julia Jacksonville 

Johnson, Pearl . . . . .Jacksonville 

Jones, Mazie Jacksonville 

Long, Mamie Jacksonville 

Long, Edward Jacksonville 

Milton, Wesley * Jacksonville 

Robinson, Rachel Jacksonville 

Simmons, Bertie Jacksonville 

Simmons, Getrude Jacksonville 

Simmons, Rlossie Jacksonville 

Sevalle, James Jacksonville 

Thomas, Patrick ..Jacksonville 

Tilman, Paul Daytona 

Tilman, Page Daytona 

Turner, Willie May Jacksonville 

Williams, Adolphus Jacksonville 

Williams, Ida Augusta, Ga. 

Total, 22. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Buhner, Annie Dell Key West 

Certain, Mamie Jacksonville 

Collins, David Jacksonville 

Ferguson, Wayno Jacksonville 

Gilbert, Flossie Jacksonville 

Hawthorne, Maud Jacksonville 

Jackson, Frank Jacksonville 

LeParte, Horace Jacksonville 

Lawrence, Rachel Jacksonville 

Morrison, Simon Fernandina 

Moseley, Harry W Jacksonville 

Perry, Moses Jacksonville 

Robinson, Lottie Jacksonville 

Solomon, Lillian Jacksonville 

Smalls, Eva .Jacksonville 

Smalls, Nellie Jacksonville 



29 

Thomas, Arthur Jacksonville 

Thomas, Marie Jacksonville 

Williams, Minnie Jacksonville 

Williams, Rosetta Jacksonville 

Williams, Seaborn... Jacksonville 

Total, 21. 



SUriMARY. 

Special 1— 1 

NORMAL OR ACADEMIC COURSE. 

Senior Class 3 

Senior Middle 2 

Junior Middle 6 

Junior 10—21 

English Course 93— 93 

Model School G7— 67 

Whole number of Students. ... .... 185 

Music Pupils 22 

Preparing for Ministry 7 

Preparing to Teach 39 

Industrial training 52 

Boys 62 

Girls 123 

Boarders 52 

Day Pupils 133 

Number of Counties represented 19 

^Number of States represented 2 



30 

HISTORY OF THE ACADEMY. 

The Florida Baptist Academy was begun in the 
spring of 1892. Rev. M. W. Gilbert, A. M., was its 
first president, with Rev. J. T. Brown, A. M., and Miss 
S. A. Blocker his chief assistants. The occasion for 
the erecting of the Academy was the cold blooded and 
unprovoked firing into the building at Live Oak, where 
the Baptists were at that time doing all of their educa- 
tional work. This murderous assault led a great part 
of the Baptists to conclude that it was a waste of 
energy to spend money and brains in a place so openly 
hostile to education. 

The Baptists in the East, under the burning elo- 
quence and cutting logic of the events, decided to build 
a school in Jacksonville. 

The enthusiasm was high, contributions were large, 
poor washwomen pledging and paying as high as $25. 
The ministry was aroused and also indignant. A 
charming block was bought in what is known as Camp- 
bell's Addition to East Jacksonville, a fine, large build- 
ing, three stories high 105x42^ feet, has been erected, 
and is fitted up for work. 

Lady teachers and girls occupy the second story. 
The rooms are furnished by the various churches and: 
individuals. 

The school has at once taken a high place, both on 
account of the great need of such an institution and 
the unusual strength of its teaching force. The first 
faculty of the Academy were as follows: Rev. M. W. 
Gilbert, A. M., president; Rev. J. T. Brown, A. M.. 
principal; Rev. J. M. Waldron, A. M. elocutionist; Miss 
S. A. Blocker, Miss Florence A. Lewis and Miss Hattie 
B. Sprague, instructors in English and music; Mrs. M. 
W. Gilbert, matron. Miss E. E. DeLyon taught music 
during the last part of this term. 



-31 

The Academy is controlled by the Negro Baptists 
of Florida, and is held in trust for them by a board 
<of nine trustees. 

The unusual energy and strategic position early 
caught the experienced eye of the American Baptist 
Home Mission Society. They aided the work at once 
and have ever since considered it a good place to spend 
consecrated money. 

Their help is only measured by their means. Flor- 
ida of all the Southern States, offers weighty and sn- 
perior reasons w r hy the Negro should be educated there. 
As a State it is the terminus of great systems of rail- 
roads and steamships, coming from the free and fertile 
^North. Florida is w r ell supplied with Northern cap- 
ital and charged with Northern energy. The Southern 
white man in Florida is in such close touch with 
progress that he has ceased to oppose the Negro. 
Jacksonville is the heart of Florida. 

The Academy is fortunate now in having the united 
efforts of all the preachers. They are aware of the 
fact that a school is needed, and that they are the re- 
sponsible leaders of this work. 

Some years ago the great specialist, Dr. Mac Vicar, 
Superintendent of Education for the American Baptist 
Home Mission Society, in making his annual report, 
mentioned Jacksonville and the Academy as one of 
the places to hold, if the society wishes to have the 
points of vantage in the South. 

The Academy is in the field for perpetual service. 
It has just closed its seventh term, with strict rules, 
and the Bible as its compass. Upon this rock we build 
our school. 



y^gr 5 Trade with those who advertise in this b 



oo J 



4& NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR NIGHT WORK. ?j$Rk: 

#^ 
^ If you ^ 

*£* send us ^^r 

£ Your PRESCRIPTIONS ^^ 

^ We will #^ 

^ not only ^> 

^ AH them ^ 

^ Accurately, but ^^ 

% Cheaper than %^> 

M any drug store 0^_ 

^ in the city ^^k 

% And only with the ^L> 

^ PUREST and 34^ 

^ FRESHEST of DRUGS, ^0 

S CHEMICALS, etc || 

^ A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE OF PERFUMERY, ^J^T 

^W TOILET ARTICLES, ETC. ^V^ 

| Simpson, Daniel & Simpson, || 

^ Presepiption Pharmacists, ^# 

^ 19 W. Bay Street, ^W 

1 Jacksonville, Florida. || 

^ THE ONLY DRUG STORE IN THE CITY ^W 

3* OPEN ALL NIGHT. 3^ 

^ ^^? 



ESTATE OF 



T. F. M C NERNY, 



WHOLESALE JOBBERS IN 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS 



OFFICE FOOT LAURA STREET. 



JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. 



Ikirk's 
H)rug 
Store. 




>>>:>$<>* 




Main ano 
fforsgtb Streets, 
Jacksonville, 
tflorioa. 






Martin Ferguson, 



t 

1 



DEALER 1N®==^<>- 



dd^i 




'V 



mm 



Carriages for Hire 



Houses for Rent. 



#- 




Call or write him at 
Cor. Beaver and Spearing Streets. 
New Phone 610. 



Dr. Arthur Walls Smith, 

PHYSICIAN 

AND.... 

SURGEON. 

OFFICE HOURS: 37 West State Street, 

7:oo to 9:00 a. m. Near Main. 

12:00 m. to 4:00 p. m. 
6:30 to 9.OO p. m. TELEPHONE 414. 

Urgent night calls are treated with dispatch. 

DR. J. SETH HILLS, 

Physician and Surgeon. 

OFFICE HOURS. •if* Office and Residence, 

7:30 to 9:00 a. m. *V N 10 

7:88 £ i.oo S: £: = West state street - 

Telephone 590. 

-♦•DR. A. L. PIERCE, -4* 

Physician and 

Surgeon 



OFFICE! Jacksonville, Fla. 

Union, Cor. Jefferson. 



CITY PHARMACY, 

GEORGE P. HART, Druggist. 
1006 MAIN STREET. 



COLD DRINKS 



C. G. ROGERS, M. D., 

Physician and Surgeon, 

720 W. Ashley Street. 

OLD PHONE 896 . — 



DR. B. W. FULLER, 

DENTIST. 

Office in Masonic Temple Building-, Cor. Forsyth & Bridge Sts. 
Teeth Extracted Without Pain. 

7 | r ISAAC JOHNSON, ^ 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

Florida Curiosities, 
Jewelry, Novelties. 



Live and Stuffed Alligators, Chameleons, 25 HOGAN ST. 

Palmetto Fans, Fly Brushes, all kinds Alligator Tooth Jewelry. 



Cohen Bros. 

Popular Dry Goods House. 

The best Store in 

the City of Jacksonville 

to trade in 



JOHN B. CIANCAGLINI & BRO., 

Leading 

Merchant 

Tailors. 



44 West Bay Street. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 



Towers Hardware, 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

HARDWARE, 

AND 

M HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 



Builders' Hardware, Mechanics' Tools, Cutlery. 



Walton 



THE TAILOR, 



.Suits to Order. Cleaning and Pressing. 



P. A. MOORE, 

DEALER IN 

Poultry, Eggs, Vegetables 
and Fruits of all kinds 
in Season 

Polite Attention. 

Prompt Delivery. 



Stall No. i5, Center Aisle, 

New City flarket. 




Old Phone 723. 

Residence Corner Argyle and Van Bnren streets. 



KOHN, FURCHGOTT & GO.'S 

IS THE POPULAR 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Carpets and 

v Millinery House of Jacksonville, Fla. 

Do your trading with them, their stock is complete, 
and their prices the lowest. 

viv ^ 5J£ 

A.B.Campbell 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

PIANOS and ORGANS. 

The colored people always buy of A. 
B. Campbell, as they are sure of being 
treated right. 

8 A MT0 5P. Nl 

SUNDAYS BY APPOINTM ENT 

DR. H. A. ANDERSON, 

DENTIST. 

Room 10 Hazeltine Bldg. 

48 W. Bay Street. Jacksonville, Fla. 

SAM A. BURKHEIM, 

ONE PRICE 

FURNISHER and HATTER. 

24 MAIN STREET. 



THE 



«• 



FLORIDA CYCLE CO., 

210 and 212 Haiti St. 

LARGEST RICYCLE HOUSE IN FLORIDA. 



*■ 



^ STATE AGENTS FOR 



* 



Syracuse 



and 



Crawford 



BICYCLES. 



* 



* 

NEW WHEELS TO RENT. 

Repairing and Enameling Our Specialty. 

We have the best equipped Repair Shop in the 
state. Call on or write us for anything in our 
line. 



* 



••» 



THE FLORIDA CYCLE CO,, 

W. H. WILLIAMS, Mgr. 

210 and 212 Hain St. Jacksonville, Fla. 

* 



* 



Everything t0 Furnish the 

House . 

From top to bottom, • • • • 

AT THE 

OLD RELIABLE 

«,v Furniture and <w 
~ c Carpet House ' IC 

Of E. F. CLARK. 

Lowest Prices Prevail. 

20=28 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Special attention given to mail orders. 

DAVIS & ROBINSON, 

Commission Merchants 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Vegetables, Fruits, Ice, &c. 

Helens Handled in Car Load Lots. 

Orders by mail or wire promptly filled. ^ ^ 



122 OCEAN St , and CITY MARKET. 
Phone 216. P. O. B. 216. Jacksonville, Fla. 



■ in iftfcMT 



WM. BYRNE, 

5.1 WHOLESALEANDRETAIL 

4* DEALER IN 

F iS£ Y GROCERIES, 

Cor. Main &, Adams Sts., Jacksonville, Fla. 

'PHONE NO. 341. 

Chas. C. Manigault & Co. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Northern and Florida Meats, Game, 

Poultry, Celery, Butter, Leaf Lard, Eggs, flilk, Cream. 

STALL 23, NEW CITY MARKET. 

Hotels, steamboats and private cars supplied at short notice. 

Proprietor Eureka Sausage Factory. 

OLD PHONE 600. 

J.C.GREELEY, #■ 

Choice NORTHERN jtfj r^» ATO 
and FLORIDA . . . I VI EL /A I W 

Poultry, Vegetables and Fruits in Season 
at Lowest Values. 

Prompt delivery any part of the city. 

J CLARK GREELEY, Proprietor. 

The Empire Shoe Company 

Carry the most stylish line of Footwear in the city. 
Their prices are as low as the lowest, and they 
guarantee their shoes to give perfect satisfaction 
for the money. Call and see them before pur- 
chasing elsewhere. 

507 West Bay Street. 



Geo. P. Gilbert, 

Bicycle Repairing 

in all Branches. 




Parts and Sundries. 

Wheels to Rent. 

Second hand wheels bought and sold. 



AGENCY 
FOR 




108 Main Street. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA 



J. DOUGLAS WETMORE. JAS. W. JOHNSON. 

Wetmore & Johnson, 

ATTORNEYS 42? 
COUNSELORS AT LAW, 



REAL ESTATE BOUGHT and SOLD. 

HONEY TO LEND. 

Collections and conveyancing of property a Specialty. 
Notaries Public. Both telephones 798. 

Rooms in Smith Building, Jacksonville, Fla. 



D. A. COOK & SON, 

Lowest Prices 
for High Grade 

Jewelry, Watches and 

w^— — Optical Goods. 

Fine Repair Work. 

Jacksonville, 
Florida. 



twm TO Ross & Austin for Groceries 



The Best Binding 

The Most for Your Money. 



WE STUDY TO PLEASE, 

AND ARE PLEASED TO STUDY 

THE NEEDS OF MODERN MEN. 





dr 




& 




jf 


Neatness, 


& 


Dispatch, 
Combined 


JL 


with 


4F 


Low Prices 
Keeps our 
Presses 


4L 
& 


busy 


& 




£? 


/ 


^r 




jw 


MOtiM 



Vance 

Sprinting vj> 

Company, 

TYPOGRAPHERS, 
LITHOGRAPHERS 



AT THE 

"SAME OLD PLACE- 



in a 

modern metropolis, 



:i» WEST BAY, 

Jacksonville, Florida. 






Southern 

Railway . . . 

Short Line North, 

East and West, 

TRIPLE DAILY TRAIN SERVICE 

Solid Vestibule Trains, composed of Dining Cars, Drawing 
Room Sleeping cars, Compartment cars, Library and Observa- 
tion cars between New York, Jacksonville, Savannah, Columbia 
and Washington, operated daily except Sunday, as the New 
York and Florida Limited. January to April, or during the 
Tourist Season. 

Through Sleeping cars to Macon, Atlanta, Rome, Chatta- 
nooga and Cincinnati, and to Birmingham, Memphis and Kan- 
sas City; also to Lexington, Louisville and St. Louis; also 
through Pullman Sleepers to Asheville, Hot Springs, "The 
Land of the Sky." 

ONLY 27 HOURS TO NEW YORK; 
ONLY 24 HOURS TO CINCINNATI, 
In Pullman Palace Cars Without Change. 
For detailed information, Sleeping car reservation, etc., please 
communicate with any agent of our connecting lines, or to 

ROBT. W. HUNT, F. P. A., 212 W Bay Street Jacksonville, Fla. 
S. H. HARDWICK, A. G. P. A., W. A. TURK, G. P. A., 

Atlanta, Ga. Washington, D. C. 

J. M. CULP, Traffic Manager, * F. S. GANNON, 

Washington, D. C. 3d V.-P. and General Manager. 

Washington, D. C. 



I 







- m 









PAMPHLET BINDERS 




This is No. 1523 


also carried in stock in the following sizes 


HIGH 

1523 9 inches 

1524 10 

1525 9 

1526 9% " 

1527 10^ " 

1528 11 


WIDE THICKNESS 
7 inches Y% inch 
7 
6 

m " 
m « 

8 


HIGH WIDE THICKNESS 

1529 12 inches 10 inches Y> inch 

1530 12 " 9H " 

1932 13 " 10 

1933 14 " 11 

1934 16 " 12 




Other sizes made to order. 




MANUFACTURED BY 




LIBRARY BUREAU 




DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 




Library Supplies of all Kinds